Did teachers" race and verbal ability matter in the 1960"s?

Coleman revisited
  • 39 Pages
  • 2.41 MB
  • 4657 Downloads
  • English
by
National Bureau of Economic Research , Cambridge, MA
Verbal behavior., Teachers., African American students., Minority teachers -- United St
StatementRonald G. Ehrenberg, Dominic J. Brewer.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper no. 4293, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 4293.
ContributionsBrewer, Dominic J., National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination39, [12], 6 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22439239M

SIMULATIONS Did teachers" verbal ability and race matter in the s. Our reanalysis of the EEO data suggest that the answer to the first question is definitely yes, "fable by: Verbal aptitude mattered as much for black teachers as it did for white teachers. Finally, holding teacher characteristics other than race constant, in some specifications black teachers were associated with higher gain scores for black high school students, but lower gain scores for white elementary and secondary by: This paper reanalyzed data from the classic study "Equality of Educational Opportunity," or "Coleman Report.".

It addressed the issue of whether teacher characteristics, including verbal ability and race, influenced "synthetic gain scores" of students (mean test scores of upper grade students in a school minus mean test scores Cited by: 1. Reanalyzes data from the classic Coleman Report. Addresses whether teacher characteristics, including verbal ability and race, influenced students'"synthetic gain scores." Findings support this hypothesis.

Details Did teachers" race and verbal ability matter in the 1960"s? EPUB

Verbal scores mattered equally for black teachers and white by: Did Teachers’ Race and Verbal Ability Matter in the ’s. Coleman Revisited. Abstract. Our paper reanalyzes data from the classic study Equality of Educational Opportunity, or Coleman Report.

It addresses whether teacher characteristics, including race and verbal ability, influencedCited by: 9. {{Citation | title=Did Teachers' Verbal Ability and Race Matter in the s. [microform]: "Coleman" Revisited. RAND Reprints / Ronald G. Ehrenberg and Dominic J. Brewer | author1=Ehrenberg, Ronald G | author2=Brewer, Dominic J | author3=Rand Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

Inst. on Education and Training | year= | publisher=Distributed by ERIC. Verbal aptitude mattered as much for black teachers as it did for white teachers. Finally, holding teacher characteristics other than race constant, black teachers were associated with higher gain scores for black high school students, but lower gain scores for white elementary and secondary students.

We find that verbal aptitude scores of teachers influenced synthetic gain scores for both black and white students. Verbal aptitude mattered as much for black teachers as it did for white teachers.

Finally, holding teacher characteristics other than race constant, black teachers were associated with higher gain scores for black high school students, but lower gain scores for.

The study found that verbal aptitude scores of teachers influenced synthetic gain scores for both black and white students. Verbal aptitude mattered as much for black teachers as it did for white teachers.

Abstract. Our paper reanalyzes data from the classic study Equality of Educational Opportunity, or Coleman addresses whether teacher characteristics, including race and verbal ability, influenced "synthetic gain scores" of students (mean test scores of upper grade students in a school minus mean test scores of lower grade students in a school), in the Cited by: 9.

We find that verbal aptitude scores of teachers influenced synthetic gain scores for both black and white students. Verbal aptitude mattered as much for black teachers as it did for white teachers. Finally, holding teacher characteristics other than race constant, black teachers were associated with higher gain scores for black high school students, but lower gain scores for white Cited by: 9.

Did teachers' verbal ability and race matter in the s. Coleman revisited. Ronald Ehrenberg and Dominic J. Brewer. Economics of Education Review,vol. 14, issue 1, Date: References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc Citations: View citations in EconPapers (29) Track citations by RSS feed Downloads: (external Cited by: Get this from a library.

Did teachers' race and verbal ability matter in the 's?: Coleman revisited. [Ronald G Ehrenberg; Dominic J Brewer; National Bureau of Economic Research.].

White Teacher is a non-fiction book written by kindergarten teacher Vivian Gussin Paley. Mrs. Paley shares with honesty her experiences teaching in an integrated school during a time when racial tensions were at their highest in the world outside of her classroom.

Mrs. Did Teachers' Race and Verbal Ability Matter in the 's?: Coleman Revisited. [Dominic Brewer; Ronald Ehrenberg; National Bureau of Economic Research.;] -- Our paper reanalyzes data from the classic study Equality of Educational Opportunity, or Coleman Report.

It addresses whether teacher characteristics, including race and verbal ability. Corrections. All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors.

You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:vyipSee general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its. Did teachers’ verbal ability and race matter in the s. Coleman Revisited. Economics of Education Review, 14, ; Levin, H.

Description Did teachers" race and verbal ability matter in the 1960"s? EPUB

A cost-effectiveness analysis of teacher selection. Journal of Human Resources, 5(1), 8 Ehrenberg, R., & Brewer, D. Do school and teacher characteristics matter. Evidence from high school and beyond. Throughout the book, Milner works hard to make it clear that he has no interest in attacking White teachers.

“I tried to make it overt that the teachers in this book are all different in terms of their race, ethnicity, teaching styles and philosophies, yet they are successful teachers of a diverse range of students.

Race relations was one area with great potential for violence, although many black leaders stressed nonviolence. Since the mids, Dr. Martin Luther King and others had been leading disciplined mass protests of black Americans in the South against segregation, emphasizing appeals to the conscience of the white majority.

Individual teachers appear to matter more for student success in the United States than in European countries because European teaching is - while U.S.

teachers have more - in running their classrooms. Coupled with the long hours teachers spend with students, classrooms become. Many have claimed that teachers' verbal ability is among the most important predictors of school outcomes.

Teachers' verbal ability has been thought. In a perfect world, the race of a teacher would matter no more than the race of a physician. However, research evidence suggests that cultural differences between teachers and. Teacher perceptions and race Dick Startz Monday, February 22 and white American cultures are still sufficiently different in that how teachers read behavior depends in part on the teacher Author: Dick Startz.

Using data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of (NELS), the authors find that the match between teachers' race, gender, and ethnicity and those of their students had little association with how much the students learned, but in several instances it seems to have been a significant determinant of teachers' subjective evaluations of their Cited by: In one research experiment, teachers were asked to examine the definitions students attached to the words and to evaluate the students' verbal skills.

Researchers did not vary the definitions but did vary the race of the students. 2 Flanagan () has developed a nonverbal intelligence test (Tests of General Ability or TOGA) which is not explicitly dependent on such school learned skills as reading, writing, and arith-metic.

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The test is composed of two types of items, “verbal” and “reasoning.” The “verbal. “Why Don’t Schools and Teachers Seem to Matter. Assessing the Impact of “Did Teacher Verbal Ability and Race Matter in the s. Revisited” (with: Coleman: Ronald G. Ehrenberg), Economics of Education Review, Vol.

14, No. 1, pp.- (RAND RP). Also published as. Over the past two decades, the short supply of teachers of color in elementary and secondary public schools has drawn the attention of policymakers and educators alike. To address the widening cultural chasm between teachers and their students, a variety of initiatives that aim to recruit people of color into teaching have been launched.

Little attention has been Cited by: This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children’s observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom.

children were observed for an average of 80 minutes during 8 occasions across 2 days using the inCLASS, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into teacher Cited by: teacher effects. These effects are simply trig-gered by a teacher's racial, ethnic, or gender identity, not by explicit teacher behaviors.

The most widely discussed examples are "role-model" effects, which occur when the presence of a demographically similar teacher raises a student's academic motivation and expecta-tions. In my professional-development work with white teachers, they sometimes remark how uncomfortable they, too, are with this example (and others) of the painful history of race relations.

As one elementary teacher said: “It is hard to tell small children about slavery, hard to explain that young black men were lynched and that police turned fire.teachers with higher opportunity costs may be more likely to leave the profession, leading to a spurious negative correlation between teacher experience and student achievement.

One method of addressing the attrition issue is to include a teacher-specific effect, to control for unmeasured teacher ability, along with the experience measures.What have you found in terms of behavior among minority students with teachers of the same race.

We found that the gap in teacher-reported externalizing behavior—or acting out—between White students and students of color (Latino and African-American students) shrunk to nearly zero by the end of kindergarten when students of color were.